The Latest

Oct 21, 2014 / 107,933 notes

(via true-lr)

Oct 21, 2014 / 140,981 notes
Oct 21, 2014 / 5,796 notes
garden-design-nyc:

Check out this modern-rustic looking bathroom sink.  Looks like a fun do-it-yourself project for the brave of heart.
Oct 21, 2014 / 2,592 notes

garden-design-nyc:

Check out this modern-rustic looking bathroom sink.  Looks like a fun do-it-yourself project for the brave of heart.

(via intrinsicxbeauty)

Oct 21, 2014 / 422,993 notes
predecessors:

The Nile River flooding by the Giza Pyramids. October 31, 1927.
Oct 21, 2014 / 3,164 notes

predecessors:

The Nile River flooding by the Giza Pyramids. October 31, 1927.

(via visual-lemonade)

thesoulfunkybrother:

-Nigeria . 82’
Oct 21, 2014 / 136 notes

thesoulfunkybrother:

-Nigeria . 82’

(via visual-lemonade)

Oct 21, 2014 / 269,287 notes
breakingbadfriends:

"Milton’s Satan is terrifying because he is recognizably human: he exhibits ambition, pride, desire for freedom, and injury at being undervalued. Like Milton’s Satan, Walt is an anti-hero, burningly intelligent and reeking of lust for power.
Walt’s dilemma is the same as Satan’s: how to assert a modicum of control — of free will — against forces larger than oneself. Satan rages against a tyrannical, unjust, uncaring God; Walt battles against the inexplicability of his cancer and a broken health-care system.
Like Milton’s Satan, Walt seeks to reason and justify his rebellion. He invokes art, science, free market rationality, protection of one’s family. In this sense, libertarians and artists alike ought to embrace Walt. He is a radical individual. His product, while problematic, merely feeds demand; demand increases, and so too must production.
Walt risks all to feed a ceaseless, self-destructive desire to be king. For Milton’s Satan, ruling Hell means liberty; for Walt, selling meth means being no one’s bitch. As Milton’s Satan says of Hell, “Here at least / We shall be free.”
– from In Hell, “We Shall Be Free”: On “Breaking Bad” by Michelle Kuo & Albert Wu
   Illustration: Paul Gustave Doré, Paradise Lost - The Fall of Satan
Oct 21, 2014 / 148 notes

breakingbadfriends:

"Milton’s Satan is terrifying because he is recognizably human: he exhibits ambition, pride, desire for freedom, and injury at being undervalued. Like Milton’s Satan, Walt is an anti-hero, burningly intelligent and reeking of lust for power.

Walt’s dilemma is the same as Satan’s: how to assert a modicum of control — of free will — against forces larger than oneself. Satan rages against a tyrannical, unjust, uncaring God; Walt battles against the inexplicability of his cancer and a broken health-care system.

Like Milton’s Satan, Walt seeks to reason and justify his rebellion. He invokes art, science, free market rationality, protection of one’s family. In this sense, libertarians and artists alike ought to embrace Walt. He is a radical individual. His product, while problematic, merely feeds demand; demand increases, and so too must production.

Walt risks all to feed a ceaseless, self-destructive desire to be king. For Milton’s Satan, ruling Hell means liberty; for Walt, selling meth means being no one’s bitch. As Milton’s Satan says of Hell, “Here at least / We shall be free.”

– from In Hell, “We Shall Be Free”: On “Breaking Bad” by Michelle Kuo & Albert Wu

   Illustration: Paul Gustave Doré, Paradise Lost - The Fall of Satan

(via heisenbergchronicles)

Oct 21, 2014 / 332 notes

heisenbergchronicles:

k.i.t. lydia

Oct 21, 2014 / 157,201 notes
Oct 21, 2014 / 175,227 notes
Oct 21, 2014 / 3,339 notes

oherebor:

get to know me [1/5] actresses: helena bonham carter

"I’ve aged, but I don’t think I’ve grown up."

(via nextstop-neverland)

Oct 21, 2014 / 404,804 notes
Oct 21, 2014 / 390,494 notes

hotllamasex:

derekstilinski:

#favorite character out of all television characters ever

seriously he literally just moved from drake and josh to icarly he didn’t need to change at all

The Dora ones kill me

(via ruinedchildhood)